Pronoun Problems

Sadly, some of the most common errors in the English language are tied to some of the smallest words – pronouns. What follows is an examination of a few of the absolute basics and a heads-up about the most common examples of pronoun abuse.

The three main types of pronouns

Nominative– these are the ones that act as the subjects of sentences (I, They, We)
Objective– These are the direct object pronouns (me, us, them)
Possessive– A possessive PRONOUN can be troublesome… Words that answer the question “Whose is it?” in a single word: (e.g. OURS, MINE, THEIRS) are definitely pronouns. They replace a more specific object. Words like my, our, and their that require a noun after them, are sometimes considered possessive pronouns, and sometimes considered possessive ADJECTIVES as in: Whose book? MY book (the word “my” here modifies the word “book”). It depends on which experts you ask. To keep it easy, we’ll treat those (e.g. “MY book”) as pronouns, not adjectives.
There are further breakdowns within these three categories, but for now, let’s keep things simple. The only other types that we want you to be aware of are…

Reflexive– These are the “-self” pronouns. (Himself, Myself)
Personal– Any pronouns one would use when referring to a person (he, them, our)
Impersonal– Any pronouns one would not use when referring to a person (it, that, these, which)

COMMON ERROR #1 – Compound subject or direct object

Nobody in this class would ever say “Doug gave the ball to I” or “Him ate all the bread” yet intelligent people make similar mistakes all the time, saying things like, “Me and my friends threw them a party” or “They sold watches to Mike and I.” The cause of the confusion is the jump from a simple subject or direct object, like in the first two examples, to the compound ones, like in the latter two examples (reminder: a compound subject is when there is more than one entity in the subject). Keep your ears open to this mistake, and catch yourself whenever you are using the compound structures. You can know if you are using the correct pronouns if you get rid of the “guest” who is causing confusion … in other words, you wouldn’t say “Me threw the party” or “They sold the watches to I”.

EXAMPLES – Correct any errors (not all examples have errors, some have several)

1) She and me went to go visit them and her yesterday.

2) They and us visited the museum before Sara told her and I not to go home.

3) He and they went shopping with her and him.

4) Don’t shut the door on him and we three travelers.

5) (Replace all names with singular pronouns in the following:) Steve and Claire took over for Michelle and Cara

COMMON ERROR #2 – Who is this ‘myself’ person?

Even if problem #1 is giving you difficulty, here’s an easy problem to stamp out – using “myself” as a cop out when you don’t know which pronoun to use (the same goes for himself, herself & themselves). For example, “They visited Marie and myself last week.” What’s more, lose the notion that this makes one sound more sophisticated or intelligent, like people who insist on pronouncing the silent ‘t’ in ‘often’ (Another irritating and widespread error). It doesn’t. Myself is a reflexive pronoun, and should be used to indicate stress (I myself answered the call) or a reflection on self-identity (I am just being myself). As a matter of fact, you should NEVER have a sentence that includes “myself” that does not include the subject “I”– this is the definition of a reflexive pronoun (which you may know from foreign language reflexive verbs).

IMPROVE THE FOLLOWING

1) The criminals robbed both Harold and myself.

2) Wanda and herself went to the bookstore

3) I offered to give themselves the cantaloupe. (Do you see how ridiculous these sound yet?)

4) Use myself correctly in an original sentence

5) Use, for the last time in your life, “myself” incorrectly (doesn’t it feel good to be rid of this plague?)

COMMON ERROR #3 – Shape-shifting (almost always from singular to plural)

This is one of the most common pronoun mistakes out there. It is grammatically incorrect to say, “A police officer must always keep an eye on their gun” or “I’m going to miss you like a child misses their blanket” (she may be Fergielicious, but she’s also grammarevolting). This problem has a simple root – avoiding the clunky, yet technically accurate “his or her.” This problem pops up frequently with singular subjects that mutate into plural pronouns, like the above examples. Two less common variations of the shape-shifting pronoun are the transformation of “I” into “you” (“hate it when you get popcorn stuck in your teeth” – unless you are being weirdly mean, this is not right) or the assumption that everybody is a man (“A teacher gets to take his work home with him every day” (see below for an important usage note). This last problem is simple to fix – make the subject plural, since you are speaking generally anyway (“Teachers get to take their work home with them”). When in doubt, one can always fall back on using the genderless singular, ‘one’. But one must admit that this can make one seem stuffy, mustn’t one?

CORRECT THE FOLLOWING (there may be more than one way to fix these)

1) A medical student must recite the Hippocratic Oath before they can become a doctor.

2) As I ventured about, you could see that everything was a mess.

3) When a woman finds she is lost in an alleyway, they often get nervous.

4) A baseball player has to know that they can’t ask for too much money.

5) A person cannot choose [their, his] own parents. (which is right in a formal essay?)

PLEASE NOTE– with this third rule – the one that assumes that everybody is a man – grammarians are split. Yes, it is technically correct to say “Somebody left his or her plates in the sink,” but if you have to use this clunky “his or her” more than once in a paragraph, it really starts to sound awful. Some people think it should be avoided at all times. And while it would be presumptuous to say “Somebody left his plates in the sink,” (women can be slobs too) this really comes down to choosing the lesser of two evils: Should I speak stiffly, but correctly (his or her dishes) or bend a grammatical rule for the sake of style (his dishes)? Most choose the latter. If the gender of the singular noun is not debatable, like with “mother” or “uncle,” you do not need to say “his/her” (e.g. :Any mother can tell you what she knows to be true about airport security these days”)

Also, in 2015, the singular “they” was selected as the word of the year, to reflect shifting gender politics. Some examples of this usage would be to discuss a person without revealing his or her gender, as in “I met someone today and they were really cute” or when the gender is unknown (I got cut off in traffic today, but couldn’t get their license plate number.” This usage hasn’t gained widespread grammatical acceptance yet (i.e. formal writing still considers the singular “they” to be a grammatical mistake), but such usage is becoming much more common in casual usage, and is an indication of how grammar can (slowly) evolve.

COMMON ERROR #4 – Nothing Personal (Who vs. Which vs. That)

OK, let’s get the easy one out of the way first. “Who” is a personal pronoun. “Which” and “That” are impersonal. That means (and I fear this may sound condescending, but this is a sadly common error) that whenever you are talking about a person, you must use “who” (or whom, of course) rather than “that” or “which”. I see a lot of sentences like the following: “Patrick Ewing was a basketball player that intimidated the opposing team,” or, “A man that gets angry easily is not a man”. In both cases, the pronoun refers back to a human (“player” in the first sentence, “man” in the second), so you would have to use “who” instead of “that”.

Now for “which” vs. “that”. Both are impersonal pronouns, and the question of when to use each one is one of the only times when the squiggly green line in Microsoft Word actually knows what it is talking about. Passive verbs are another, but that’s another story. The difference between that and which is a dying distinction, but here it is: When the sentence requires a comma immediately before the pronoun in question, use “which”. If it doesn’t, use “that”. Two examples of correct usage: “He bought a car that runs on ethanol” and “He bought a car, which is a four-wheeled metal structure.”

1) Paraphrase the following: “He bought a dog that surprises me”

2) Paraphrase the following: “He bought a dog, which surprises me”

3) The best player on the team will be the one (Who/Which/That) improves the most over the season

4) Sandy was disappointed when she lost the instructions, (Who  / Which  /  That) are so important in building a bike

5) Create a sentence or two that shows an understanding of how to use the pronouns “Who” “Which” and “That”

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